Posted in Genitals: A User's Guide

But, Am I Normal?

We seem to sometimes fall in to the habit of talking about ‘discharge’ from the vagina as if it’s always bad thing- for example as a sign of an infection.  It can be easy for forget that it’s also a healthy part of how this bit of your vulva works.  The vagina produces a mucousy discharge that helps keep it clean and protects from infection.  But what is it ‘meant’ to look like?!  Healthy discharge should be:

  1. SMELL – not strong and/or unpleasant.
  2. COLOUR – clear or white.
  3. CONSISTENCY – thick and sticky or slippery and wet.

It’s perfectly normal for it to vary a bit with age and during different bits of the menstral cycle, but as long as it’s within these parameters, it’s all perfectly normal… so now you know!

 

Posted in Genitals: A User's Guide

Filling in the Blanks

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Every now and then I see an image of a penis whilst out and about.  Various public places lend themselves particularly to this, such as the back of loo doors or bus seats.   I bet you know exactly what it looks like.  In fact, you’re probably picturing what it looks like now, a sausage shape with two circles for testicles.  If the artist is paying particular attention to detail, you might get some strands of hair sticking out of them, or some ejaculate coming out of the top.

As yet, I’ve never seen a vulva presented in quite the same way.  Occasionally they are seen as a piece of more formally displayed art – The Vulva Gallery is my current favourite maker and curator of such images.  Why is this?  Is it the different social-cultural meaning that the different genitalia have?  Or maybe it’s just not being quite sure what to draw.

With this in mind, here’s my step-by-step guide to drawing vulvas.  I’m not encouraging you to draw on public property, but I’m wishing that more people could.

First, draw a leaf- type shape.

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This is the vestibule, the smooth bit that is usually covered by the labia.

Next, draw two ‘lips’ either side like so:

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These are the labia majora, the fatty pads of tissue that surround the vulva.  If you like, hair can be added here.  They often cover the rest of the bits that we’re going to draw, but which are still external.

Let’s add a bit more detail.  We now need to make two more ‘inner lips’, of the labia minora.

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These can be either hanging out beyond the labia majora, or can nestle within.  When people (incorrectly) talk about a ‘vaginoplasty’ or ‘designer vagina’ they are often referring to labiaplasty , or surgical reduction of this area.

We now need to start adding some detail.  First, let’s add a little round circle.  Let’s go wild and make it red.

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This represents, you’ve guessed it – the clitoris.  Or at least the bit of the clitoris that can be seen externally.  There are a lot of misconceptions about the clitoris.  Suffice to say, the bit that you can see here represents just a small part of the total structure of the clitoris. It is a sensitive area, which contains millions of nerve endings and is often overlooked because its main purpose seems to be sensual with no conventional reproductive function.

Moving on to another often over looked area of the vulva is the first of the two ‘openings’ in to the internal part of the body, the urethra.  Let’s draw another small circle in the vestibule to represent the area where urine comes out, running straight from the ‘storage’ area of the bladder:

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An important point to note is that this is a separate and distinct area from the vagina.   Urine comes out of this.  Babies, periods and discharge from infections of the internal reproductive tract do not.   They come from the second ‘hole’ in the vestibule, the vagina.  Of course, in real life it isn’t a hole that maintains itself and is ‘squashy’, although can accomodate being made larger – e.g. by neonates’ heads, tampons or penises, for example:

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So if it’s a bigger than this, or more squashy, that’s spot on.

You can stop here.  Because it’s often overlooked, I’m going to add some remnants of the hymenal tissue.  Note that in health, this is not a complete covering or seal.

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Voila!  And remember – this is only a schematic.  Vulvas you have seen may look completely different from this AND THAT IS ABSOLUTELY FINE.