Posted in Genitals: A User's Guide, Uncategorized

By Design

Ever heard the term ‘designer vagina’?  This generally refers to a certain type of cosmetic surgery, not to the vagina itself but to the ‘inner lips’ (or labia minora) of the vulva.  Surgery here involves removing tissue from and reshaping the appearance of the labia minora- in other words to ‘trim’ it.   Many people with vulvas have a labia minora that protrudes so that it appears visible – therefore however large this is it is likely to be ‘normal’.  Additionally, in young people biological changes occur during puberty that can change the appearance of the inner labia.  For this reason it is often recommended by the NHS that those under 18 do  not get this type of surgery.  However, there seem to cases of children having labiaplasties.  According to one report over 200 people received labiaplasty procedures funded by the NHS in 2015-2016.  We know that people with visible labia are more likely to think that their genitals look ‘abnormal’ than those without, even though both are equally common (Lykkebo et al, 2017). Some accounts have blamed this on the prevalence of seeing only vulva with neat and invisible labia minora.  Whatever the cause, the desire to have this type of surgery seems increasingly common with a 45% rise seen in labiaplasty numbers worldwide between 2015 and 2016.

 

 

 

Posted in Genitals: A User's Guide

Dare to Hair

Pubic hair and body positivity can be a tricky issue. On the one hand, people absolutely have the right to cut, shape, dye, remove or in any other way sculpt their own personal body space! I get how it can be liberating and a way of taking control of your own body and quite literally shaping your intimate identity.

On the other hand, there seems to be a growing repulsion for body hair that isn’t manicured. A dislike for ‘natural’ hair, particularly (but not exclusively) when it comes to vulvas. Some people specifically find it ‘unhygienic‘. This despite the fact that pubic hair, like the hair on your head, has specifically protective functions.

So trim and go as bare as you dare around your nether regions if you want to. But maybe think about why your doing it!

Posted in Genitals: A User's Guide

Unwelcome Visitors: Thrush

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Thrush is one of the causes of unusual vaginal discharge. Usually not ‘offensive’ smelling, it is often described as ‘cottage cheese’ – it has that kind of lumpy and white quality.  Or like the chest of the bird thrush, which is speckled and light compared to the rest of its body!

Unlike other causes of abnormal discharge, it is not a sexually transmitted infection.  STIs are spread from person to person, through direct contact such as skin-to-skin or bodily fluids (saliva, mucous, semen, blood, etc).  Thrush however, is an overgrowth of a type of fungal yeast (candida albicans) that ordinarily lives in other parts of the body, without causing an infection.

As well as the discharge, it is usually accompanied by an itching feeling.  Thrush proliferates in damp parts of the body.  As well as being able to cause infection in the vagina, in can therefore cultivate under the foreskin of the penis, or in skin folds around the rest of the body.

Vaginal thrush is treated with a cream, a pessary (i.e. a ‘tablet’ that comes with a device to be put straight in to the vagina), an oral tablet or combinations of these.  In the UK, this treatment is available ‘over the counter’ – you can go to a pharmacy and get it without a prescription.  However, it’s a good idea to go to your GP if it’s the first time you’ve had thrush.  They can then check that this is what it is.  It’s important to get further medical help if you’ve had regular infections or tried the treatment before and it isn’t working.  You may also need to see your doctor if you have other medical complications as well.

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References:

NHS, ‘Thrush in Men and Women’, accessed 14.11.2018.

Wikipedia, ‘Candida Albicans’, accessed online 14.11.2018.

Centre for Disease Control and Protection, ‘Candidiasis’, accessed 15.11.2018.

EMC, ‘Canestan Duo Patient Information Leaflet’, accessed online 15.11.2018.

 

Posted in Genitals: A User's Guide

It’s What’s Inside that Counts?

My weakest area at med school was definitely anatomy. I enjoyed it though. Each week, we would go to the anatomy suite where the cadavers were kept and I would learn another thing I was previously mistaken about. The relationship between what we see and understand on the outside and what and where it is on the inside is often not straightforward.

The stomach, for example, is not the low down bit of the abdomen people hold when they have ‘bellyache’ – that’s more like bowels. This is part of the gut, but with has a distinct and different function. What a lot of people think of as the ‘vagina’ (the passage from the external body to the womb) would actually be better described as the ‘vulva’. In my experience, these misconceptions are rife in ideas about our reproductive organs. Let’s have a look at some of the internal xx anatomy…

Vagina: a passage leading from the outside to internal parts. It’s made up of muscular, stretchy tissue that can deform and accommodate various things (tampons, fingers, foreign objects, a baby…).

Cervix: the lower bit of the womb. Roughly tube shaped and typically around 2-3cm long. It has a hole (the cervical ‘os’) which leads from the vagina to the womb. It can change shape, size and consistency under hormonal control – e.g. getting smaller and opening during childbirth.

Uterus: Or ‘womb’. This is where a baby can grow. Sits just behind the bladder in non-pregnancy. The lining of this cavity is called the ‘endometrium’. It is the endometrium thickening and then shedding that is experienced as periods. The top bit of the uterus is called the ‘fundus’.

Fallopian tubes: connect the uterus to the ovaries. Also called the ‘salpinges’ or a ‘salpinx’. Each one ends in a ‘fimbria’. This is a little fringe of tissue that helps convey eggs in to the tubes from the ovaries.

Ovaries: whitish lumps of tissue where eggs are released from. They also produce hormones so have an important endocrine role.

All of these structures sit quite low down in the abdomen. Sometimes problems that feel like they are coming from this reproductive tract can be mistaken for problems with the bowel and vice versa. We’ll have a look at some of these problems another time…