Posted in Genitals: A User's Guide

Playing Around

The information here is adapted from an exercise from Sexplain UK, used as part of their SRE lessons.   In short, it involves using play dough to build genitals.  This exercise can be used to teach people about external genitalia (both penises and vulvas).  As an arts and crafts activity, it can be fun and engaging and help to give something concrete to talk around in terms of things like physiology, variation and health.   I have also included the recipe I use for homemade play dough.

To make your dough.

Ingredients:

2 cups plain flour

1 cup of salt

2 teaspoons cream of tartar

1 tablespoon of vegetable oil

2 cups of boiling water

Something to colour the dough with (optional) such as food dye, paint powder, or a crushed soft pastel

Instructions:

Put all of the ingredients except for the water and colouring in to a large mixing bowl.  Boil water and add this to the mix whilst still very hot.  Mix immediately using a wooden spoon.  Once the mixture is cool enough to handle, put some flour on a surface and lightly knead the mixture for a short time.  If you are adding colouring, now knead this in until the dough is roughly all the same shade throughout.

Make sure the dough is left uncovered until it is cool, then cover in an airtight container.  It should last for about a week.  This recipe makes enough for about twelve people if doing the exercise below.

2018-10-26-14-33-561.jpg
Vulva models made from play dough recipe

 

So, all foetuses have the same general genital structures, regardless of what sex they will become.  They then typically (but not always) differentiate in to either a penis or vulva.  These are the external genitalia (i.e. the bits you can see).

We’ll look at vulva first, as this is the one people tend to find a bit trickier.

Take your ball of play dough and divide it in to four pieces.  With one of these quarters, make a left or diamond shape:

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This is the vestibule of the vulva.

Next, take another quarter and roll it in to a sausage shape, about the length of one side of the vestibule and attach it to one side:

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This is the labia majora, the fatty tissue that covers the whole vulva and tends to be covered in hair after puberty.  Complete it by making another sausage to attach to the other side:

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Next, divide the last quarter in to two.  With one piece, make a smaller sausage to attach inside one side of the labia majora.  This can be flattened if you like:

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This is the labia minora.  In about half of people with vulvas, the ‘inner lips’ of the labia minora sit outside of the bigger ‘outer lips’ of the labia majora.  Let’s complete these.  As with the labia majora, it’s not a problem if they aren’t exactly symmetrical:

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Next, let’s make a very important structure: the clitoris.  Either take a little ball of extra dough, or pinch a piece off from your existing structure:

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The bit we can see here only represents the external part – it extends to be a much bigger structure internally.  The clitoris is made of very sensitive tissue, with lots of nerve fibres.  Some people find it arousing or stimulating when touched gently.

To complete, let’s make the ‘holes’ in the vulva.  Get people to guess how many ‘holes’ the vulva contains (guesses I’ve heard range from one to twenty!).  For this model, we’ll be looking at two (you can explain that some people talk about a third, the anus, which is actually outside/below the vulva).  The first is about a third of the way down and can be marked with a finger or a pencil:

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Get students to guess its name – the urethra, and it’s function – carries urine away from the body.  It is separate from the next hole we’re going to make.  This hole is nearer the bottom of the vestibule and can be marked by making a hole all the way through:

2018-10-26 14.25.27

Again, you can get people to guess the name (vagina) and point out that this is the name people often use (incorrectly) to refer to the vulva. You can talk about things that come out of the vagina – i.e. blood (periods), babies and discharge (either healthy or a sign of otherwise, such as thrush or bacteria).

Next, we’ll make a model of a penis.

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This time, divide the dough in to two pieces.  With the first piece, make a sausage shape:

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This represents the shaft of the penis.  We can then make a little distinct area by marking out the end:

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This is the glands of the penis, which tends to be more sensitive than the shaft.  Next we can make a hole in the end (with a pencil or finger).  This is the urethra or the penis.  Three things can come out of this – urine, ejaculation or discharge.

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Give people the option of making a foreskin – pinch off a little bit of dough and fashion in to a thin rectangle to cover the glans.  This is a good point to talk about hygiene – e.g. washing with water and changes during puberty, as well as circumcision.

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Next, we’ll finish off with making the testicles (scrotum).  There is a good chance that students will already have made them with the other half of the dough by making two balls and attaching these to the base of the penis:

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This is fine and validate this.  Also explain that you can make them from a ‘teardrop’ shape and attach that.  You can talk about the misconception that ‘balls drop’ (i.e. they get bigger and hang lower after puberty, but don’t actually ‘drop’ further out of the body).

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It can be a nice idea to get the students to look at and reflect on how different all of the bits are.  Lots of them seem to ask what ‘normal’ is – this can be a good place to point out that this is something that is highly individual.

We often talk (briefly) about the concept of it being possible to be biologically ‘intersex’ – i.e. it is possible to have someone who doesn’t have external genitalia that fall neatly in to either of these categories.

It can also lead on nicely to talking about internal genitalia and reproductive functions.

 

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Current life goals: smash the patriarchy, save the planet.

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